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dc.contributor.authorMascaro, Olivier
dc.contributor.authorCsibra, Gergely
dc.date.available2022-03-29T08:54:54Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn0956-7976
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797613500509
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14018/9719
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates whether human infants go beyond learning about individual social partners and their relations, and form hypotheses about how social groups are organized. We test 15-month-olds’ capacity to represent social dominance hierarchies with more than two agents. Infants find it harder to memorise dominance relations presented in an order that hinders the incremental formation of a single structure (Study 1). Thus, infants attempt to build structures incrementally, relation by relation, thereby simplifying the complex problem of recognizing a social structure. Infants also find circular dominance structures harder to process than linear ones (Study 2). These expectations about the shape of structures may facilitate learning. Our results suggest that infants attempt to represent social structures composed of social relations.
dc.description.urihttp://pss.sagepub.com/content/25/1/250
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectSocial dominance
dc.subjectTransitive reasoning
dc.subjectSocial relations
dc.subjectStructure learning
dc.subjectNaive sociology
dc.subjectCognitive development
dc.subjectSocial structure
dc.subjectSocial cognition
dc.subjectInfant development
dc.titleHuman infants' learning of social structures: The case of dominance hierarchy
dc.typeJournal article
dc.source.journaltitlePsychological Science
dc.source.volume25
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.spage250
dc.source.epage255
refterms.dateFOA2022-03-29T08:54:54Z
dc.contributor.unitDepartment of Cognitive Science
dc.identifier.urlhttp://pss.sagepub.com/content/25/1/250


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