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dc.contributor.authorKosher, Rowena B.D.
dc.contributor.authorHoughton, Lauren C.
dc.contributor.authorWinkler, Inga T.
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-24T09:59:46Z
dc.date.available2023-07-24T09:59:46Z
dc.date.issued2023-07
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2023.115974
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14018/14054
dc.description.abstractTrans and nonbinary experiences of menstruation are subject to menstrual discourse that is deeply gendered. Terms such as “feminine hygiene” and “women's health” make trans and nonbinary people acutely aware that they fall outside of the ideal of the default menstruator. To better understand how such language affects menstruators who are not cis women and what alternative linguistic strategies they adopt, we conducted a cyberethnography of 24 YouTube videos created by trans and nonbinary menstruators, along with their 12,000-plus comments. We observed a range of menstrual experiences—dysphoria, tensions between femininity and masculinity, and transnormative pressures. Using grounded theory, we identified three distinct linguistic strategies vloggers adopted to navigate these experiences: (1) avoiding standard and feminizing language; (2) reframing language through masculinization; and (3) challenging transnormativity. The avoidance of standard and feminizing language, coupled with a reliance on vague and negative euphemisms, revealed feelings of dysphoria. Masculinizing strategies, on the other hand, navigated dysphoria through euphemisms—or even hyper-euphemisms—that showed an effort to reclaim menstruation to fit within the trans and nonbinary experience. Vloggers responded through tropes of hegemonic masculinity, using puns and wordplay, and sometimes relying on hypermasculinity and transnormativity. Transnormativity, however, can be polarizing, and vloggers and commenters who rejected stratification of trans and nonbinary menstruation challenged it. Taken together, these videos not only uncover an overlooked community of menstruators who demonstrate unique linguistic engagement with menstruation, but they also reveal destigmatization and inclusion strategies that can inform critical menstruation activism and research as a whole.
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectMenstruationen_US
dc.subjectTransgenderen_US
dc.subjectNon-binaryen_US
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_US
dc.subjectEuphemismsen_US
dc.subjectMasculinityen_US
dc.subjectTransnormativityen_US
dc.titleMANstruation: A cyberethnography of linguistic strategies of trans and nonbinary menstruatorsen_US
dc.typeJournal article
dc.source.journaltitleSocial Science & Medicine
dc.source.volume328
rioxxterms.versionVoRen_US
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen_US
refterms.dateFCD2023-07-24T09:59:46Z
refterms.versionFCDVoR
refterms.dateFOA2023-07-24T09:59:46Z
html.description.abstractTrans and nonbinary experiences of menstruation are subject to menstrual discourse that is deeply gendered. Terms such as “feminine hygiene” and “women's health” make trans and nonbinary people acutely aware that they fall outside of the ideal of the default menstruator. To better understand how such language affects menstruators who are not cis women and what alternative linguistic strategies they adopt, we conducted a cyberethnography of 24 YouTube videos created by trans and nonbinary menstruators, along with their 12,000-plus comments. We observed a range of menstrual experiences—dysphoria, tensions between femininity and masculinity, and transnormative pressures. Using grounded theory, we identified three distinct linguistic strategies vloggers adopted to navigate these experiences: (1) avoiding standard and feminizing language; (2) reframing language through masculinization; and (3) challenging transnormativity. The avoidance of standard and feminizing language, coupled with a reliance on vague and negative euphemisms, revealed feelings of dysphoria. Masculinizing strategies, on the other hand, navigated dysphoria through euphemisms—or even hyper-euphemisms—that showed an effort to reclaim menstruation to fit within the trans and nonbinary experience. Vloggers responded through tropes of hegemonic masculinity, using puns and wordplay, and sometimes relying on hypermasculinity and transnormativity. Transnormativity, however, can be polarizing, and vloggers and commenters who rejected stratification of trans and nonbinary menstruation challenged it. Taken together, these videos not only uncover an overlooked community of menstruators who demonstrate unique linguistic engagement with menstruation, but they also reveal destigmatization and inclusion strategies that can inform critical menstruation activism and research as a whole.en_US
dc.identifier.piiS0277953623003313
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Healthen_US
dc.source.beginpage115974


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