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dc.contributor.authorSchedler, Andreas
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-16T14:43:30Z
dc.date.available2023-06-16T14:43:30Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.issn0022-216X, 1469-767X
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0022216X22000499
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14018/13976
dc.description.abstractSince the inauguration of Mexican democracy in 2000, organised criminal violence had been leaking into the political arena. Yet, it escalated in the 2018 elections, when dozens of local candidates were killed. In most of these cases, the concrete perpetrators and motives remained in the dark. How did Mexican society make sense of this opaque, unprecedented wave of electoral violence? On the basis of a qualitative content analysis of over 1,200 news reports, I examine the structuring power of a shared narrative: the frame of organised crime. By conceiving candidate killings as economic violence within the criminal community, this commonsensical frame of interpretation permitted Mexican society to ‘normalise’ these killings as ‘business as usual’ by criminal organisations.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleMaking Sense of Electoral Violence: The Narrative Frame of Organised Crime in Mexico
dc.typeJournal article
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Latin American Studies
dc.source.volume54
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.spage481
dc.source.epage507
dc.description.versionPublished version
refterms.dateFOA2023-06-16T14:43:30Z
dc.contributor.unitOther
dc.source.journalabbrevJ. Lat. Am. Stud.
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0022216X22000499/type/journal_article


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