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dc.contributor.authorKapelner, Zsolt
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-16T14:43:21Z
dc.date.available2023-06-16T14:43:21Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1356-4765, 1572-8692
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11158-019-09437-0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14018/13910
dc.description.abstractOppressive governments that use violence against citizens, e.g. murder and torture, are usually thought of as liable to armed revolutionary attack by the oppressed population. But oppression may be non-violent. A government may greatly restrict political rights and personal autonomy by using surveillance, propaganda, manipulation, strategic detention and similar techniques without ever resorting to overt violence. Can such regimes be liable to revolutionary attack? A widespread view is that the answer is ‘no’. On this view, unless a government is or is likely to turn violent, revolution against it is disproportional. After all, revolution would involve launching potentially lethal attacks against oppressors who do not threaten the lives and bodily integrity of their subjects but pose only lesser threats. I argue that this claim of disproportionality is false. Armed revolution against Stably Non-violent Oppressive Regimes (which are neither violent, nor are likely to become violent) can be proportional under some circumstances, thus they may be liable to revolutionary attack. My argument relies on the Responsibility-Sensitive Account of Proportionality. This account holds that responsibility for posing threats renders agents liable to greater defensive harms than the harms with which they threaten. Even if non-violent oppressive regimes do not threaten citizens with murder, serious physical injury, or enslavement, their responsibility for creating an environment in which citizens’ political rights and personal autonomy are extremely restricted may loosen the proportionality requirement of inflicting defensive harm and render them liable to revolutionary attack.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleRevolution Against Non-violent Oppression
dc.typeJournal article
dc.source.journaltitleRes Publica
dc.source.volume25
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.spage445
dc.source.epage461
dc.description.versionPublished version
refterms.dateFOA2023-06-16T14:43:21Z
dc.contributor.unitDepartment of Philosophy
dc.source.journalabbrevRes Publica
dc.identifier.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11158-019-09437-0


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