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dc.contributor.authorBogaards, Matthijs
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-16T14:43:09Z
dc.date.available2023-06-16T14:43:09Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1424-7755, 1662-6370
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/spsr.12371
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14018/13828
dc.description.abstractTwo schools dominate the literature on democracy in divided societies: consociationalism and centripetalism. The first advocates group representation and power sharing while the second recommends institutions that promote multi-ethnic parties. Although often presented as mutually exclusive choices, in reality many new democracies display a mix. Drawing on the experiences of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Fiji, Lebanon, Malaysia, and Northern Ireland, this article examines the empirical and theoretical relationship between centripetalism and consociationalism. The aim is to explore the conditions under which they reinforce each other (friends) or work at cross-purposes (foes). A better understanding of the interaction between consociational and centripetal elements in post-conflict societies not only yields a more nuanced picture of institutional dynamics, but also holds lessons for institutional design.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.titleConsociationalism and Centripetalism: Friends or Foes?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.source.journaltitleSwiss Political Science Review
dc.source.volume25
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.spage519
dc.source.epage537
dc.description.versionPublished version
refterms.dateFOA2023-06-16T14:43:09Z
dc.contributor.unitDepartment of Political Science
dc.source.journalabbrevSwiss Polit Sci Rev
dc.identifier.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spsr.12371


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