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dc.contributor.authorAnthony, Brandon P.
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-16T09:16:34Z
dc.date.available2023-06-16T09:16:34Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn2071-1050
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su13137407
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14018/13772
dc.description.abstractDamage-causing animals (DCAs) originating from protected areas which inflict damage on persons and property are particularly contentious when promises to satisfactorily address such conflicts, either by protected areas or other management institutions, are left unfulfilled. Human–wildlife conflicts (HWCs) of this nature can erode trust and if not adequately resolved, assure the maintenance of tense relationships between parks and neighboring communities. This paper, based on archival research, interviews and community focus groups, examines management responses to the long history of DCAs exiting the Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. First, I document historical promises of compensation and the subsequent responses by conservation agencies to local communities to address these past injustices. Recent strategies to the DCA problem at KNP have been multi-faceted and include a wildlife damage compensation scheme initiated in 2014 which entails financial retribution given to affected farmers who have lost, and continue to lose, livestock to DCAs originating from the park from 2008 to date. I then present livestock farmers’ recent perceptions of DCAs, the compensation scheme itself, and proposed avenues for going forward. Despite continuing challenges in the process, I demonstrate that fulfilling promises is a key step to building relational trust and legitimacy and must be considered in similar contexts where protected areas and other conservation agencies are key actors in managing HWC.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectDamage-causing animals
dc.subjectHuman–wildlife conflict
dc.subjectInstitutional trust
dc.subjectKruger National Park
dc.subjectLivestock compensation
dc.subjectPark–community relationships
dc.titlePaying for the Past: The Importance of Fulfilling Promises as a Key Component to Resolving Human–Wildlife Conflict
dc.typeJournal article
dc.source.journaltitleSustainability
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.issue13
dc.source.spage1
dc.source.epage20
dc.description.versionPublished version
refterms.dateFOA2023-06-16T09:16:34Z
dc.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Sciences and Policy
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/13/13/7407


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY 4.0