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dc.contributor.authorTatone, Denis
dc.contributor.authorCsibra, Gergely
dc.date.available2022-03-29T09:11:12Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0140-525X
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x14000740
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14018/11699
dc.description.abstractWe argue that direct active teaching in humans exhibits at least two properties (open-endedness and content opacity) that make the recognition of teaching episodes without ostension untenable. Thus, while we welcome Kline’s functional approach to the analysis of teaching, we think that she ignores important features of the socio- environmental niche in which human teaching likely evolved.
dc.description.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x14000740
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.titleLearning in and about opaque worlds. Commentary on: How to learn about teaching. An evolutionary framework for the study of teaching behavior in humans and other animals, by Michelle Ann Kline
dc.typeJournal article
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioral and Brain Sciences
dc.source.volume38
dc.source.spagee68
dc.source.epagee68
refterms.dateFOA2022-03-29T09:11:12Z
dc.contributor.unitDepartment of Cognitive Science


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